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Games Later Generations

A session to remember

I haven’t really felt like playing games lately. Before I always had a couple of games ready to play when I was ready for the next one. Nowadays I’m struggling to find a game that really hooks me.

I have to be really stubborn to keep playing, as was the case with Alwa’s Awakening. A game I enjoyed the beginning and end of, but I hated the ending story-wise.

Enter Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night. A game which I had anticipated long before it was released since I love Castlevania: Symphony of the Night and Aria of Sorrow.

I bought it on Saturday morning and the first session ended around midnight the same da, which just smaller breaks for food. The longest gaming session since February last year when I beat The Last Guardian in one sitting, approximately 14-15 hours.

Right after starting playing I was hooked. The feel is just right for a Igavania. The graphics isn’t amazing but I think it’s secondary to gameplay which is exactly right.

The next day I started the day by playing Bloodstained and didn’t end before 8 hours had passed. The game had me hooked for sure. It was almost scary.

I have some more stuff to do in the game (on final boss otherwise) . Unfortunately I feel a bit burned out at the moment due to the long sessions prior. I am excited to soon be finishing this great game.

Categories
Games Later Generations

Dishonored (PC)

Back in 2012 I didn’t play that many single player games. I was studying and was watching a lot of speedrunning aswell as trying to speedrun myself. It was a couple days before October 12th. I logged onto Steam and found a game on the front page that was about to be released. The game was Dishonored, a title that I’d never heard or seen before. I thought it looked interesting with its very unique look with a more stylized choice of graphics.

I was gonna have a pretty slow weekend, so I wanted a game to play by. When I saw Dishonored, I bought it, preloaded it and at release I played it. I WAS HOOKED! The dark nature in the parallell victorian universe, really spoke to me. Revenge stories are also always interesting to me. I was actually watching the TV-show Revenge at the time.

The overarching story is that Corvo Attano, the Royal Protector, framed and accused to have killed the Queen he swore to protect. He is obviously framed. You follow the story of Corvo, getting revenge on those who framed him. With a little help by The Outsider, a mysterious man with otherworldly powers, Corvo becomes a very dangerous threat to his enemies. The most stand-out ability, that really defines the way you play is the Blink ability, making Corvo able to teleport a short distance to reach new places.

Being set in a alternative/parallel Victorian England where whale oil is the the main source of energy, really give the game a special flare. I love games that do quirky things, but explains them so they work in the universe of the game. Just small things like the guards sing “what shall we do with the drunken whaler” just adds to the atmosphere.

Dishonored has a lot of things going it. Free roaming levels that encourages exploration, but there is still a set goal to beat the level. How to beat the level does however often involve a choice. This is what makes the game stand out. Almost everything you do is followed by a choice, but the choice are often anchored in gameplay, not just a dialogue menu choice.

Do you want to go berserk and slaughter the enemies. Do you want to go stealthy, lethal, non-lethal? Do you want to hide the knocked out or killed enemies so you don’t alert other enemies, or do you not care about it? Sometimes there are different ways to get to an objective location. This makes it very exciting play the levels in different ways. Leaving a lot of dead bodies around may increases the amount of rats and Weepers (Zombie-esque monsters) in following levels.

There are alternative objectives to find during the levels that can help you and also alter the outcome of the level or a future level. In addition to the main and alternative objectives there are collectibles, runes and bone charms. These are helpful to customise Corvo to the player’s liking.

I am very happy that I chose to purchase a completely unknown games for me, even before it was released. It’s one of the best gaming experience for me. Dishonored has been a benchmark for me when it comes to level design and stylized graphics for 8 years.

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Games Later Generations

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (PC/PS4)

The world is in a Witcher craze right now. After the Netflix series the interest for the games and the book was renewed. The game that was release in May 2015 during a time I didn’t play that many games on PC or home consoles. I had just discovered the wonderful world of the 3DS and was reliving the worlds of Mario and Pokemon among other, though in more modern take than before. I did, however pick it up in 2018 when testing a gaming laptop and needed a game that would be demanding for the hardware.

I can’t say that the Witcher craze didn’t effect me, I did play both Witcher 1 and 2 for the first time during the first months of 2020. I even played through Witcher 3 for the third time. This gave me a opportunity to make different decisions from the past playthroughs. I have to admit, I do like the choices I made in prior playthroughs so I did stick to some of them this time aswell. Just because there was another option I didn’t systematically choose the other. It had to feel right.

Geralt in beautiful White Orchard

Feeling right, is one of The Witcher 3’s great strength, the atmosphere, the almost magical feeling the world emits everywhere, from its environments to its creatures, as well as the people and the choices, that I the player makes for them. I have many times wondered what’s so unique about the Witcher world, perhaps it’s the source material, perhaps its Polish heritage, I don’t know. What I do know, is that it is something special. Something to cherish.

Choosing a different set of armour, changing playstyle and focusing on a new skill set, making this playthrough a different experience all together. This time focusing on alchemy instead of signs really affected the way to play the game. Instead of hiding the perhaps weakest part of the game, the combat, behind accessible magic I had to go head first into battle with just my dodging skills to rely on. To add to this change I also played on the difficulty “Blood and Broken Bones”. Luckily I was made aware of that the alchemy route is extremely powerful which made my journey very pleasant.

I also got to revisit an old “friend”, the card game of Gwent, which is the only card game that I’ve ever been into, that I’ve found fun and appealing. This meant that I had to get a full deck, even though it’s one of the more time-consuming ventures in the game.

Geralt in the free city of Novigrad

After a while, and approximately 100 hours I was in a position where the main story was the least interesting part. This just added to my play time since I avoided the main story as much as I could. To think of it, this is crazy, because the main story is a very well told story with interesting twists and turns, likeable characters and difficult choices.

One part I don’t particularly like about the main story is game’s wish to force Yennefer and Geralt together. Since I did not opt for Yennefer this time around, it was very frustrating that the game actively set up scenarios where they got close. Making Yennefer the most important woman in the game instead of Triss that was chosen this time. Might feel like a small thing, but it retracted from the feeling that I, the player was in control of what was happening.

Eventhough there are small annonying elements, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is an excellent game that will be on my top games list for many many years.

I like it so much that I got a Platinum trophy on PS4, and only missing one Steam achievement to get all at both platforms.

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Games Later Generations

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey (PS4)

After rejecting the franchise for many many years, I late 2017 reluctantly bought the Ezio Collection for PS4. This opened up a new world of games for me.

After playing through the whole Ezio story in less than a month, I knew that I liked the narrative and the feel of the Assassin’s Creed games. I did however not, dive into more traditional AC games except a short dive into Assassin’s Creed III. After playing The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Horizon Zero Dawn and The Witcher 3, I had found an appetite for open-world games. After a friend saying [about HZD] “Amazing game, probably ties for GOTY last year with Assassins Creed: Origins”, that really piqued my interest to take a deeper dive into the franchise. Its newer open-world concept that seemed to fit me perfectly.

After playing Origins, which I liked very much, enough to put over 100 hours into as well as getting the Platinum Trophy, I started Odyssey. 15 hours in I lost interest. The shift to more decision-making in conversations and the – boat/ship/whatever – didn’t do it for me. I ended up upsetting the guards and spent most of my time trying to kick soldiers off roofs until I died to a mercenary stronger than me. It wasn’t much fun.

This takes us back to the present, when over 115 hours has been invested in this huge adventure. Odyssey was easier to appreciate after a hiatus from Origins.

I like Odyssey very much, but it’s far from a perfect game. The sea combat is still one of the weaker points in the franchise as a whole, and it’s the same for this game. The story is good, but with the vast world and many targets it does get tedious at times. I didn’t feel it became grindy, I always had something to do, side quests or other objective to gain experience in a way that felt worth my time.

I do understand the critique with the game being to big for its own good, but for me that want a relaxing experience that doesn’t end too quickly it was a very pleasant journey.

Kassandra does feel a bit rigid and bland, but the story around her is full of life. With multiple choices the experience is a bit more taxing on the player, since some of the choices aren’t easy. The problem is that it doesn’t feel like the choices really matter. The dialogue options leading to the different outcomes are also not always conveyed in a way to the player knows what outcome each option leads to.

Ubisoft has always been good at the visuals, be it 2D or 3D. Odyssey is no exception. The scenery is amazing and one point that really trumps Origins, where the environment can be described as:

Sand, sand, sand, sand, gravel and dust, what a f***ing country. It’s the desert!

Crude Translation of Robert Broberg’s song “Öken”

The islands are beautiful, so is the ocean. Finding synchronisation points are always a joy since they often overlook a very stunning view. This is probably the main advantage Odyssey has over Origins, its more pleasing locale and scenery.

I am currently playing the first DLC, Legacy of the Blade. Which seems to tie the rather non-Assassin’s Creed-like game that Odyssey to earlier games. In what extent I do not yet know. It’s possible that I will write about my experiences in the DLCs aswell. But at a later date.

I do recommend people to play this game if open-world games are your cup of tea and you aren’t too tired of the UbiTower concept.

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Games Later Generations Retro

Castle of Illusion (2013) (PC)

There are remakes and then there are remakes. Sega of Australia’s first (and sadly, only) game is a re-imagining of a Sega classic from the early 90’s. Castle of Illusion was released for the Mega Drive back in 1990 and is still considered as one of the better platformers on the system. If that’s true or not can be discussed for hours. Me, I do not love the original, I very much prefer the port for Sega’s 8-bit machine the Sega Master System, a different game in its entirety, but not relevant right now.

One game I however like quite a lot is the remake of the Mega Drive game, which confusing enought has the exact same name, Castle of Illusion. In my circuit we usually refer to it as HD to differentiate it from the Mega Drive (and Game Gear) and SMS versions with the same name.

There are a lot of 3D sections where Mickey can move freely in every direction

Castle of Illusion (2013) is a complete re-imagining of the same, mixing 2.5D and 3D. The overarching story and world themes are the same, but everything else i completely new. As for the story, Mickey and Minne are on a romantic picnic. This is unacceptable for the witch Mizrabel, so she kidnaps Minnie. Mickey is of course not happy, so he goes after them.

When it comes for differences from the original there are so much to talk about. For starters the game now has a hub where there are doors to be unlocked. To unlock these doors you have to collect diamonds and beat the different world bosses. You may reenter the worlds if you don’t manage to collect enough diamond. In addition to diamonds, there are other items to collect, that doesn’t do anything for progression but to unlock costumes and achievements.

The Hub World

As the games has been transformed a bit into a collect-a-thon it very appropriate to have Grant Kirkhope of Banjo-Kazooie/Tooie and Donkey Kong 64 fame rearranging the score. The music feels natural and it is mainly just the original tunes that are reworked to fit in with the new aesthetic. There are however a few parts that are new and very Kirkhope-esque.

Mickey controls very well and mechanic-wise it’s very solid except a couple of minor bugs that sadly won’t be fixed since the studio was closed down short after the game was released. Luckily they did have time to release v1.1 which added 60 FPS-support which is a must-have.

This is for me an example of a remake done right, and I’m glad I’m opted for this one and not the Duck Tales Remaster that was released around the same time.

The 2D sections are 2.5D, so the paths are noy completely straight, but you can only move in two directions.

The game is pretty short just like its original so it’s faithful in that regard. There are however plenty of stuff to collect even after finishing the game.